The Meaning of Stoicism (Martin Classical Lectures. Volume XXI)

"As the ancients themselves knew, Stoicism was once no longer a uniform doctrine. during the centuries there existed factions; the Stoics valuable their independence of judgment and quarreled between themselves." but, "despite their person changes, the Stoic dissenters remained Stoics. That which that they had in universal, that which made them Stoics, is what I comprehend because the which means of Stoicism."

therefore delimiting his framework, Ludwig Edelstein makes an attempt to outline Stoicism through greedy the elusive universal point that certain jointly a few of the factions in the moral method. He starts this exemplary essay with an outline of the Stoic sage—the excellent aimed toward via Zeno and his followers—which establishes the elemental features of the philosophy. Mr. Edelstein then proceeds to a extra certain exam, discussing the Stoic techniques of nature and dwelling in accord with nature; the inner feedback of the second one and primary centuries B.C., which shows the restrictions and percentages inherent within the doctrine; the Stoic's lifestyle and his perspective towards sensible affairs, revealing the values loved by way of the adherents of the Stoa; and, eventually, where of Stoicism within the background of philosophy.

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24. Agis and Cleomenes 23 ( 2 ) , 805 E. INDEX Academy, 2 1 lively precept, 24 Alexander the good, thirteen, 14, ninety three Anger, 2 Antiochus, 17 Apatheia, 2, three, four urge for food, fifty three Aristarchus, 30 Ariston, five Aristotelian, 2 nine, sixty four; iclealism, 2 1 ; scbool, 21; syllogis m , 28; psy­ cbology, fifty two; lo g ic, ninety five Aristotle, 1, 2, 15, 20, 2 1 , 25, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 34, forty, forty nine, 50, fifty two, fifty three, fifty six, fifty eight, 60, sixty two, sixty six, sixty nine, seventy three, seventy five, seventy six, seventy nine, eighty two, 87 Arnold, Matthew, 18, ninety eight Asclepius, ninety three Astronomy, 19, 30, 31, forty nine, 6 6 Augustine, 1 Bacon, Francis, 22, 30, 39, forty Benevolence, four, four 1 , 6 eight , seventy eight, eighty two, ninety, ninety two Bergson, Henri, three 1 organic: organic analogy, three 1 ; strategy, three 2 Biology, 1 nine, 2 1, 30 Carneades.. _1 7 C asuis test, seventy one, eight nine Cato, eight five reason, 25, 28, sixty two warning, four Charity, seventy eight, ninety Christinnity, seventy two, ninety, ninety six; enrly, nine 1 Chrysippus, three, five , 7, 12, 1 6 , 1 7 , 29, forty five, forty six, forty eight, forty nine, fifty two, 60, sixty three, sixty seven, 70, seventy four, seventy eight, eight three, eighty four , ninety six Cicero, three, 17, forty six, fifty four, seventy three, ninety, ninety six Cle anthes , 12, sixteen, 30, three 1 , 34, forty five, forty six, forty nine, fifty two, sixty three, 70, seventy eight, 89 Commiserntion, four Compassion, ninety; freedom from, three Conversion, 38, nine 1 Copernicus, N icolnu s , 30 braveness, four 1 , fifty nine, ninety Cynic, five, 14, 2 1 Daimon, fifty six, eight four Demetrius Poliorcetes, 1 three Democritus, 2 eight Descartes, René, 2, 39 hope, four, five, thirteen, fifty two, fifty three Dionysius, 12 Disposition, 23, 26 Divination, eighty one, eighty two Divine hearth, 25 goals, 12 responsibility, 37, forty two, forty four, five 1 , seventy two, seventy three, seventy five, seventy seven, eighty, eighty two, eighty three, eighty five, 86, 87, 89, ninety two , ninety seven schooling, fifty seven, 88, 89 Eliot, T. S .. fifty eight Epictetus , 2, three, five, 6, 7, 10, 12, forty six, seventy four, eighty, eighty four, 89, ninety, nine 1 , ninety two, ninety four Epicureanism, thirteen, 29, 30, forty nine, eighty one, ninety two, ninety five INDEX 106 Epicurus, 12, thirteen, 15, 28, 38, 6 1 , seventy two, ninety three Epistemology, 17, 18 Equality of husband and wi fe, seventy three fairness, classical doctrine of, eighty three Etemal recurrence, 32 Ethics, sixteen, 2 1 , 34, 35, forty two, sixty four, 70, seventy one, seventy two, seventy three, seventy four, 88, ninety six; profes­ sional, seventy seven, seventy eight Euclid, 6 1 Eudaimonia, l , 50, fifty one Eupatheia, four Evil, 33, sixty two; ethical, fifty five, sixty two; meta­ actual, sixty two Existentialism, ninety six destiny, sixty two, sixty four, sixty six worry, four, 10, thirteen, fifty nine strength ( power ) , 23, 24, 26, 30, 33, 36 Fortune, 10, sixty five, ninety four Galen, 33, 6 1 , sixty four Geography, forty nine, 50, 6C3 Geology, sixty six Geometry, sixty one God, 1 , 2, 7, eight, nine, 1 zero, 14, 18, 32, 33, 34, forty two, forty three, forty four, 6 1 , sixty three, sixty six, seventy seven, seventy nine, eighty, eight 1 , eighty two, 88, nine 1 , ninety four Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, reliable will , 1 Govemment, sorts of, 85-87 Greek tragedy, fifty eight 20, sixty four, ninety two, 38 Happiness, 1 Hellenistic : structures, l; interval, 1 1 , 15, 29, four 6 ; Skepticism, 17; aes­ theticians, fifty seven; scientists, sixty seven; utopias, seventy nine ; age, 87; conception of kingship, 86 Hesiod, 1 6 Hierocles, seventy two ancient relativism, eighty four liiSlory, 50, fifty eight, sixty five, sixty six, eighty four Horace, 10 Human judgment of right and wrong, eighty four, eighty five Human freedom, sixty six I luman nature, 34, 35, 38, 39, forty four, 50, fifty four, fifty seven, 88, 89 llumanitas, ninety Hume, David, 2C3 Hylozoism, three 1 Hypothetical syllogism, 27 Immortality, eight Incorporeal, 25 Indifferentism, five Individualism, 29, 70; individuality of guy, forty two, fifty four lndividualization of items, 25 lnsight, four 1 , seventy eight, eighty two, eighty five, 88, ninety seven purpose ( internal perspective ) , five Isocrates, seventy three pleasure, four; rational, 1 zero Justice, four 1 , seventy nine, ninety, ninety two; suggestion of, eighty three Kant, 1, 17, forty two, forty four, fifty five, eighty, eight 1 , ninety seven Lactantius, ninety, nine 1 past due Stoa, 34, four 2 , four five , forty six, seventy two legislations : normal, seventy eight, eighty three, eighty four, eighty five, ninety six; ethical, fifty one, fifty four, seventy eight, 87; confident, eighty three; nationwide, eighty five; overseas, eighty five Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm von, sixty two, sixty three good judgment, sixteen, 17, 18, 26, 27, 29, 39, forty six, sixty three, sixty four, seventy one, 88, ninety five trademarks, 31-32 guide hard work, Stoic cstimate of, seventy five Marcus Aurelius, five, forty six, 89, ninety four Materialism, 20, 2 1 , 22, three 1 , sixty three arithmetic, 30, 60, sixty six Malter, 24, 25, 31 , fifty three, 6 1 , sixty four Metaphysics, 17, 20, 2 1 , 24 heart Stoa, sixteen, forty five, forty, forty eight, forty nine, 70 Mill, John Stuart, 26 Moderation ( temperance ) , forty-one, seventy six, ninety Monism, sixty four ethical : worthy, five; progress, 12; pur­ pose, 15; motion, sixteen, 50, sixty eight, ninety, ninety seven Morally stable, 6, fifty two, sixty eight 107 INDEX Musonius, 70, nine 1 , ninety four Naturalism, 2 1 , 22, forty nine Nnt n ral theology, eighty Nature, sixteen, 18, 19, 23, 30, three 1 , 34, 36, 37, forty, four 1 , forty five, fifty two, fifty three, fifty four, fifty five, 60, sixty two, sixty four, sixty eight, eighty three, eighty four, 88, ninety; residing ( existence ) according to, 50, fifty one, fifty five, fifty six, sixty eight, eighty four useful connection, 28 priceless occasions, 29 Necessity, 28, 29, 30, 34, sixty two, eight 1 Nietzsche, Friedrich, 32 Oikeiosis, 35 previous Stoa, 34, forty five, forty six, 50, fifty two, fifty seven, 60, sixty two, sixty three, sixty four, sixty seven, 70, ninety Optimism, 12, fifty four, 70, ninety seven Panaetius, 12, forty six, forty seven, forty nine, 50, five 1 , fifty two, fifty three, fifty four, sixty seven, 6 eight , sixty nine, eight 1 Pantheism, 6 1 , sixty four Paradoxes ( Stoic ) , sixteen, seventy three, 89, ninety Pascal , Blaise, nine, ninety three, ninety six Passions ( feelings ) , three, four, 39, forty, four 1 , forty two, fifty two, fifty three, fifty five, fifty six, fifty seven, fifty eight, fifty nine, nine 1 , ninety three; freedom from, 2, four, 39 Perfection, 12, sixteen, 89, nine 1 , ninety three Perfcctionism, cthos of, 1 1 Peripatelics, 2 Petrarch, Francesco, fifty nine Philanthropy, ninety Philosophy, 15, fifty eight, 88; Greek, 1 , 34, forty eight, sixty nine Phoenicia, 30 Physics, sixteen, 17, 18, 19, 21, 29, forty six, sixty one, sixty four, seventy one, 88, ninety five Pity, 2, three, nine Pinto, 1 , 7, 1 1 , 12, 1 five, 19, 20, 2 1 , 25, 27, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35, forty, forty nine, 50, fifty two, fifty three, fifty six, fifty eight, 60, sixty nine, eighty two, eighty four, 87, 88, ninety two, ninety six Platonic : idenlism, thirteen, sixty four ; tuition, 2 1 ; psychology, fifty two; scheme of edncatfrm, fifty seven; mythology, fifty eight Plntonism, 18, 29, forty six, sixty nine, ninety two, ninety seven Plensure, four, nine, fifty five, fifty seven Pliny, sixty eight Plotinus, 28, ninety six l'lutarch, sixty four, ninety four Pncuma, 23, sixty four Poetry, fifty seven, fifty eight Polyhins, sixty five Pope, Alexander, 2, 39, forty Posidonius, 12, three 1 , forty six, forty seven, forty nine, 50, fifty five, fifty six, fifty seven, fifty eight, fifty nine, 60, 6 1 , sixty two, sixty three, sixty four, sixty five, sixty six, sixty seven, sixty eight, sixty nine, 70, eighty five strength, 23, 33, 36, sixty two, ninety five; forma­ tive, three 1 ; psychagogic, fifty seven, fifty eight; of shape, sixty four Precepts ( ideas ) , 7 1 , seventy five, 89 Prcferrcd, issues ( items ) to be, five, 6, fifty two, sixty eight Presocratic : philosophy, 18, 20, 60; platforms, three 1 Presocratics, 1 nine precept o f association, 22, 23, 25, 37 growth, 1 1 , 12, 50, fifty seven, sixty five, sixty six, sixty seven, sixty eight, seventy nine, nine 1 , ninety six windfall, eight, 34, sixty two Pythngoras, 60, 7 1 document­ Pytlmgorenn l'ythngorcan : trine , sixty four ; thought of labor and workmnnship, seventy five Pythagoreanism, forty nine Hcason , 19, 21, 22, 27, three 1 , 32, 36, 37, 38, 39, forty, four 1 , forty two, forty three, forty four, forty eight, forty nine, 50, fifty two, fifty three, fifty four, fifty five, fifty six, fifty nine, 60, sixty three, sixty six, sixty eight, eighty two, eighty three, eighty four, eighty five, 86, ninety, ninety two, ninety seven; praetieal, 36, 37, 38, forty, forty four, ninety seven; seminnl, 23, sixty five Rej ected, issues to be, five faith, eighty spiritual practices, eighty one Renaissance, 2, three, 22, 50 Rights of the opposite individual, seventy four position in existence, doctrine of, five 1 , fifty four, seventy seven Rousseau, Jean Jacques, fifty five Sage, 2, three, four, five, 6, eight, nine, 1 zero, 1 1 , 12, 14, sixteen, 17, 18, 37, forty-one, forty three, forty four, fifty seven, seventy three 86 87 · Stoic three.

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